d
c

Homily

Homily :: May 28, 2017

05/28/17: Seventh Sunday of Easter


Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson

      05/28/17: Seventh Sunday of Easter - Fr Dave Reeson

.(5:51, 5.36 MB)


Fr Pat Nields

Fr Pat Nields

      05/28/17: Seventh Sunday of Easter - Fr Pat Nields

(7:59, 7.31 MB)


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

Within the axis of Ascension and Pentecost, today’s Scriptures offer insight to how the community reacted to the absence of Jesus. In the selection from Acts, it is reported that the apostles with some women disciples returned to the “place where they were staying” and devoted themselves to prayer.

The selection from First Peter again encourages the community to enter into suffering as a redemptive practice and not return insult for insult. Any who give offense to a Christian are to be loved and embraced; the suffering, a chance to grow closer to Christ.

John’s gospel gives us the prayer of Jesus before his suffering and death. The oratio of Jesus acknowledges that he has come from the Father and will return to the Father, however, it is the disciples and Christian community that will be responsible for making Christ known in the world. The Christian community is in the world but not of the world, thus marking them as special in God’s eyes and having a special part in the salvation history as the Church grew. This prayer is a signal of Church which will, in Johanine theology be born from the blood and water that poured from Jesus’ side after his death on the cross.

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: May 14, 2017

05/14/17: Fifth Sunday of Easter


Dcn Eric Vande Berg

Dcn Eric Vande Berg

      05/14/17: Fifth Sunday of Easter - Dcn Eric Vande Berg

(7:13, 6.61MB)

 

 

 


Dcn Steve Jordan

Dcn Steve Jordan

      05/14/17: Fifth Sunday of Easter - Dcn Steve Jordan

(7:48, 7.14 MB)

 

 

 


Dcn Bob Stier

Dcn Bob Stier

      05/14/17: Fifth Sunday of Easter - Dcn Bob Stier

(6:45, 6.19 MB)

 

 

 


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

The proclamation from the Acts of the Apostles continues with the account of the community’s growth and need for ministers of service for the poor. The choosing of 7 people to “serve at table” indicates a diaconal ministry for taking care of the poor so the apostles could focus on the ministry of proclamation and preaching. Note that the prayer and the laying on of hands, an early witness to what would be come a developed ordination ritual, is here present in the biblical account.

The selection from the First Letter of Peter offers the kernel of what would become a developed understanding of the people as a royal priesthood and holy nation that would be set apart to give praise and glory to God. The author of this epistle, delineates for the fledgling first century Church its purpose of worship to God.

The selection from the fourth evangelist is part of the farewell discourse of Jesus situated after the last supper. Jesus assures the disciples that he is “the way, the truth and the life” and that he is showing the disciples (and community) the way to God the Father. This text indicates that Jesus is the only way to come to knowledge and communion with God. John is writing late in the first century, a generation or more removed from the life, death and resurrection of Jesus. He encourages the disciples (community) not to lose heart but to persevere and grow in knowledge of God through faith in Jesus Christ.

For the third millennium followers of Jesus, encouragement is given to take up the ministry of service to a broken world and be signs and symbols of Christ’s presence by our care for one another and those who have no voice.
By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: May 7, 2017

05/07/17: Fourth Sunday of Easter & Confirmation


Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson

      05/07/17: Fourth Sunday of Easter - Fr Dave Reeson

(3:13, 2.95 MB)

 

 


Fr Pat Nields

Fr Pat Nields

      05/07/17: Fourth Sunday of Easter - Fr Pat Nields

(5:12, 4.76 MB)

 

 


Archbishop George Lucas

Archbishop George Lucas

      05/07/17: Fourth Sunday of Easter - Archbishop George Lucas

(16.04, 14.7 MB)

 

 

 


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

The fourth evangelist, John, offers a discourse from Jesus about being shepherd and sheep gate. The voice of Jesus assures the late first century Christian community of the importance of listening to his voice and resting in his safety. Jesus promises to keep the flock (the Christian community) safe from thieves and robbers. For the community today, it is important that our music and liturgy focus on the voice of the shepherd and not get too impressed with having our own voices, gifts and talents get in the way.

The selection from the Acts of the Apostles exhorts people of faith who have heard the message to be “baptized…for the forgiveness of your sins” and “receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.” The words of Peter have been prescient for many generations, “Save yourselves from this corrupt generation.” The more things change, the more they stay the same. In all times and generations, the culture has been a challenge to living a life of faith in Jesus Christ and being witnesses to the world of God’s power over sin and death.

The words from the First Letter of Peter offer us a glimpse of how we are to embrace suffering to follow in the footsteps of Jesus. Whereas our culture embraces vengeance and revenge, the redemptive suffering and sacrifice of Jesus our what we are to embrace. Like the non-violence of Ghandi and Martin Luther King, we are exhorted to “return no insult”, not to threaten but to hand ourselves over willingly for the sake of our faith. Doing so, we will be saved by the shepherd who knows his sheep.

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: April 30, 2017

04/30/17: Third Sunday of Easter

Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson;
See Jesus?

On April 30th, I used the following illustration in my homily to help us understand that we often need to focus and concentrate to see Jesus. Even some of the Disciples failed to see Jesus when he was in their midst. I may not see Jesus in someone that thinks differently than I do or someone that cuts me off in the parking lot. If we concentrate and focus we can see Jesus all around us!

See Jesus?

 

Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson; First Communion Mass

      Third Sunday of Easter - Fr Dave Reeson

(5:59, 5.48 MB)

Concentrate on the four dots in the middle of the picture for about 30-seconds. Then close your eyes, or look up toward the ceiling. Within seconds, you will see an image. Continue looking at the image…What Do You See?? Is it a heavenly sign?
      20170430: Third Sunday of Easter - Fr Dave Reeson

(8:29, 7.78 MB)

Fr Pat Nields

Fr Pat Nields

See Jesus?

Fr Pat Nields

Fr Pat Nields; First Communion Mass

      Third Sunday of Easter - Fr Pat Nields

(6:04, 7.78 MB)

      20170430: Third Sunday of Easter - Fr Pat Nields

(5:32, 5.06 MB)


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

04/30/17: Third Sunday of Easter

The resurrection appearances of Jesus are central elements of the Gospel in all three cycles of the lectionary. Scripture scholars believe that it is these resurrection accounts that were some of the first written recollections of the salvific events of Jesus suffering, death and resurrection

The story of Emmaus from Luke’s Gospel is perhaps one of the best known stories of Jesus’ appearance after the resurrection. The recognition of him in the “breaking of the bread” is an obvious image of the Eucharistic meal. The fledgling Christians were no doubt coming together for the “breaking of the bread” and doing what Jesus did on the night before he died. No doubt, this meal included reminiscence of Jesus as well as sharing of stories from the Hebrew scriptures.

The proclamation from the Acts of the Apostles is a well developed exposition of the importance of Jesus’ life, death and resurrection for the community. It contains the kernel of what would later become an article of the Creed, namely, that Jesus was both God and man, that he died on the cross, rose from the dead and is not seated at the right hand of the Father in heaven and sent the Holy Spirit.

The selection of First Peter is a deepening of the theology of Jesus life and death. It places Jesus in the scope of terrestrial history with universal significance attached to his resurrection. “Before the foundation of the world” Jesus was known and now revealed to you in glory.

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved.

Homily :: Second Sunday of Easter (Sunday of the Divine Mercy)

04/23/17: Sunday of Divine Mercy


Dcn Russ Perry

Dcn Russ Perry

Dcn Duane Thome

Dcn Duane Thome

      04/22/2017: Sunday of Divine Mercy - Dcn Russ Perry

(6:27, 5.91 MB)

      04/23/2017: Sunday of Divine Mercy - Dcn Duane Thome

(9:11, 8.41 MB)

Deacon David Krueger

Deacon David Krueger

Dcn Dave Graef

Dcn Dave Graef

      04/23/2017: Sunday of Divine Mercy - Dcn David Krueger

(9:44, 8.91 MB)

      04/23/2017: Sunday of Divine Mercy - Dcn Dave Graef

(5:47, 5.19 MB)


Daily Readings
Today’s Reading

John places this resurrection appearance of Jesus on the “first day of the week” which would have been an “anniversary” some time distant of the day of resurrection. The Gospel passage for today’s liturgy has two key points: the handing over of the Spirit for the forgiveness of sins and the admonition to Thomas, “blessed are those who have not seen and have believed.” Written more than a generation after the tragic events of the crucifixion and triumphant day of resurrection, these last words were no doubt an encouragement to the community of disciples to shore up their belief in Jesus, the Son of God.

The passage from the Acts of the Apostles presents the community of believers in idyllic terms: devoted to the teaching of the apostles, the communal life, the breaking of the bread (Eucharist) and the prayers (psalms). The evangelist known as Luke writes in the Acts of the Apostles of a tight-knit community that experienced the fruits of the resurrection; namely, signs, wonders and miracles. The result was the growth of a Church into a movement that would have great success.

The selection from the First Letter of Peter speaks of suffering “through various trials” that the community will face in order to test the genuineness of their faith in the fires of suffering.

The Scriptures of today call the Church back to the basics which is apostolic teaching and sharing of the Eucharist. We are a people that have not seen, yet believe in the power of Jesus Christ victorious over sin and death.

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved.

Homily :: April 9, 2017

04/09/17: Palm Sunday with First Form: The Procession


Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr Pat Nields
      04/09/17: Palm Sunday of the Lord's Passion - Fr Dave Reeson

(1:47, 1.63 MB)

      04/09/17: Palm Sunday of the Lord's Passion - Fr Pat Nields

(4:57, 4.53 MB)


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

This day is named after the Gospel readings that we will hear. The account of the entry into Jerusalem and the Palms the people waved is put against the account of the passion of Christ, his death for us told in excruciating detail.

What are we to make of this contrast? How are we to apply this to our own lives? The reading from Isaiah with the responsorial psalm and the famous Philippians hymn that is our second reading interpret these Gospels for us. God sees us as all the actors in the passion.

We are the ones who wave the palms, the ones who drive the nails and the spear into the body of Christ, we are Mary and Peter and the apostles; but above all we are to be Christ for others, we are to lay down our life for the love of neighbor.

And because of this call to accept the life of Christ with all its joy and pain, the glory and the suffering, we can expect to share in the lifting up of the Philippians hymn, sharing in the Lordship of Christ to the glory of the Father forever.

By Glenn CJ Byer, MA SLD © 2004, OCP. All rights reserved.

Load More