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Pastor

Homily :: May 21, 2017

05/21/17: Sixth Sunday of Easter


Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson

      05/21/17: Sixth Sunday of Easter - Fr Dave Reeson

(7:05, 6.50 MB)


Fr Pat Nields

Fr Pat Nields

      05/21/17: Sixth Sunday of Easter - Fr Pat Nields

(6:06, 5.58 MB)


Daily Readings


Today’s Reading

The Scriptures of this Sunday mark a turn in the celebration of the Easter Season. We begin to focus on the promise of the Holy Spirit. In the selection from Acts, after the people of Samaria are baptized “in the name of Jesus” and accept the word of God, apostles are sent to pray over them so they receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. Three elements are indicated as necessary for living lives of faith: hearing and accepting the word of God; baptism with water; and the prayer for the Holy Spirit.

The selection from the First Letter of Peter seems to speak to a community that is undergoing trials or persecution for their faith. The sacred writer indicates to the community what is meant by being one with Jesus in his suffering, death and resurrection. Instead of reacting to violence with violence, the community is encouraged to join their sufferings to the suffering of Christ, and thus enter into redemptive suffering to be made holy and grow in faith. Christians may suffer for doing good, but they will grow in the Spirit the more they enter into the paschal mystery of suffering.

In John’s Gospel, Jesus promises to send the apostles (and community) the gift of the Holy Spirit to guide them on their Christian journey and strengthen them in time of adversity. The evangelist encourages those who may have become disillusioned with the fact that Jesus had not returned in glory with salvation for all. This part of the farewell discourse of Jesus is intended to give hope and strength to the believers, and give confidence to the doubters.

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: May 7, 2017

05/07/17: Fourth Sunday of Easter & Confirmation


Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson

      05/07/17: Fourth Sunday of Easter - Fr Dave Reeson

(3:13, 2.95 MB)

 

 


Fr Pat Nields

Fr Pat Nields

      05/07/17: Fourth Sunday of Easter - Fr Pat Nields

(5:12, 4.76 MB)

 

 


Archbishop George Lucas

Archbishop George Lucas

      05/07/17: Fourth Sunday of Easter - Archbishop George Lucas

(16.04, 14.7 MB)

 

 

 


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

The fourth evangelist, John, offers a discourse from Jesus about being shepherd and sheep gate. The voice of Jesus assures the late first century Christian community of the importance of listening to his voice and resting in his safety. Jesus promises to keep the flock (the Christian community) safe from thieves and robbers. For the community today, it is important that our music and liturgy focus on the voice of the shepherd and not get too impressed with having our own voices, gifts and talents get in the way.

The selection from the Acts of the Apostles exhorts people of faith who have heard the message to be “baptized…for the forgiveness of your sins” and “receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.” The words of Peter have been prescient for many generations, “Save yourselves from this corrupt generation.” The more things change, the more they stay the same. In all times and generations, the culture has been a challenge to living a life of faith in Jesus Christ and being witnesses to the world of God’s power over sin and death.

The words from the First Letter of Peter offer us a glimpse of how we are to embrace suffering to follow in the footsteps of Jesus. Whereas our culture embraces vengeance and revenge, the redemptive suffering and sacrifice of Jesus our what we are to embrace. Like the non-violence of Ghandi and Martin Luther King, we are exhorted to “return no insult”, not to threaten but to hand ourselves over willingly for the sake of our faith. Doing so, we will be saved by the shepherd who knows his sheep.

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved.


Reeson’s Ramblings :: May 7, 2017

Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson

Dear Friends,

JIm Makey

Jim Makey

I have some news that I need to share with you. I am sad to announce that Mr. Jim Makey has decided, after much prayer and soul searching, to resign his position as Principal at the end of this school year. I have really enjoyed working with Mr. Makey. I have a great respect of how he has handled our staff, students and all the committees and activities that make our school so vibrant. We have such an awesome school thanks in no small part to his leadership and direction.

As a first time pastor with such a large grade school, he has helped me personally learn what a successful school should look like. Although we are sad to see Mr. Makey go, we are grateful for the time he spent here at St. Columbkille and wish him and his wife, Betty, all the best for their plans for the future and our prayers will be with them always.

 

 

Brandi Redburn

Brandi Redburn

The other side of this coin is that I am delighted to announce that Brandi Redburn has agreed to be the new Principal of St. Columbkille School. Over the past two school years, I have been so impressed by her skills and abilities, and I am confident that in her very capable hands, the transition will be seamless.

The students, parents and staff will have a dynamic leader who is 100% committed to the families of the school and our mission. I have no doubt that our school will continue to offer our students the very best Catholic education in the Archdiocese under the direction of Mrs. Redburn.

PAX,
Fr. Dave

 

 


What Do You See?? Is it a heavenly sign?

Jackie Buso

Jackie Buso

Jackie Buso has done a tremendous job as our parish Bulletin Editor and Athletics Administrator for the  past five-years. Now with two children in Catholic High Schools, she has decided it is time to return to fulltime employment. She does more than most realize and is going to be greatly missed. She will continue on a part-time basis until her replacement is secured.

We are now considering comprehensive staffing needs for our parish and job description for the Bulletin Editor and Athletics Administrator is being adjusted. Employment opportunities at our parish will be made known and a search committee established soon. Watch the bulletin or our web site for more information.

Homily :: April 30, 2017

04/30/17: Third Sunday of Easter

Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson;
See Jesus?

On April 30th, I used the following illustration in my homily to help us understand that we often need to focus and concentrate to see Jesus. Even some of the Disciples failed to see Jesus when he was in their midst. I may not see Jesus in someone that thinks differently than I do or someone that cuts me off in the parking lot. If we concentrate and focus we can see Jesus all around us!

See Jesus?

 

Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson; First Communion Mass

      Third Sunday of Easter - Fr Dave Reeson

(5:59, 5.48 MB)

Concentrate on the four dots in the middle of the picture for about 30-seconds. Then close your eyes, or look up toward the ceiling. Within seconds, you will see an image. Continue looking at the image…What Do You See?? Is it a heavenly sign?
      20170430: Third Sunday of Easter - Fr Dave Reeson

(8:29, 7.78 MB)

Fr Pat Nields

Fr Pat Nields

See Jesus?

Fr Pat Nields

Fr Pat Nields; First Communion Mass

      Third Sunday of Easter - Fr Pat Nields

(6:04, 7.78 MB)

      20170430: Third Sunday of Easter - Fr Pat Nields

(5:32, 5.06 MB)


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

04/30/17: Third Sunday of Easter

The resurrection appearances of Jesus are central elements of the Gospel in all three cycles of the lectionary. Scripture scholars believe that it is these resurrection accounts that were some of the first written recollections of the salvific events of Jesus suffering, death and resurrection

The story of Emmaus from Luke’s Gospel is perhaps one of the best known stories of Jesus’ appearance after the resurrection. The recognition of him in the “breaking of the bread” is an obvious image of the Eucharistic meal. The fledgling Christians were no doubt coming together for the “breaking of the bread” and doing what Jesus did on the night before he died. No doubt, this meal included reminiscence of Jesus as well as sharing of stories from the Hebrew scriptures.

The proclamation from the Acts of the Apostles is a well developed exposition of the importance of Jesus’ life, death and resurrection for the community. It contains the kernel of what would later become an article of the Creed, namely, that Jesus was both God and man, that he died on the cross, rose from the dead and is not seated at the right hand of the Father in heaven and sent the Holy Spirit.

The selection of First Peter is a deepening of the theology of Jesus life and death. It places Jesus in the scope of terrestrial history with universal significance attached to his resurrection. “Before the foundation of the world” Jesus was known and now revealed to you in glory.

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved.

Reeson’s Ramblings :: April 30, 2017

Reeson’s Ramblings and Fr. Pat’s Ponderings

Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson

The Easter Season is such a hopeful time. The joy of the Resurrection of our Lord; he  has conquered death and conveys salvation and love to us. Even the warmer weather of this  season and the scent of Easter lilies can lift the spirits. If we gave kudos to each  person that was involved in making Holy Week and Easter beautiful and successful, this  bulletin would contain nothing more because so many volunteers were so very actively  involved.

In reflecting upon Holy Week, our parish Triduum liturgies were beautiful celebrations  leading us all closer to Christ through the remembering and representation of the Paschal  Mystery. At the Easter Vigil Mass, we were honored to witness the baptism, profession of  faith, confirmation, and reception of first Holy Communion by some of our newest parish  members – those who participated in the RCIA and Come & See programs this year. If you  came to Mass on Easter Sunday, you know we welcomed more faithful people than our church  could even hold!

Fr Pat Nields

Fr Pat Nields

Months of formation and weekly meetings prepare the Elect for their reception of the  sacraments at Easter Vigil, and countless hours of behind-the-scenes preparation go into  planning the liturgies and creating beautiful, welcoming spaces for us to worship in. We’d  like to thank the groups of dedicated folks who live their call to discipleship by  participating in these ministries:

  •  Thank you to the RCIA Team and Come & See catechists for their ongoing  dedication to evangelization and formation of new disciples.
  •  Thank you to those who spent part of their Holy Week cleaning the  worship space and providing art and environment that remind us of the beauty God  surrounds us each day.
  •  Thank you to those who worked around the parish grounds to provide a  beautiful, welcoming scene as people arrived to worship.
  •  Thank you to the Liturgical Ministers – sacristans, servers, EMHCs,  lectors and ushers (ministers of hospitality) –  who helped to create seamless liturgies.
  •  Thank you to all the ushers for the welcoming hospitality and providing  needed service with our collections.
  •  Thank you to our parish musicians who helped us to raise our voices to  give all glory to God. A special thank you to our dedicated choir who sang each  evening of the Triduum and was back bright and early Sunday morning to sing!
  •  Of course, a thank you to our Deacon community, for the witness they  provide and assistance and service throughout Holy Week in the various liturgies  and who were instrumental in facilitating the smooth flow of the Masses in the Church and the overflow in the Social Hall for the most crowded Masses.
Nicole Cook

Nicole Cook

Michelle Grzywa

Michelle Grzywa

Bill Heese

Bill Heese

A particular thank you to Nicole Cook, our Coordinator for Disciple Formation, for all  her efforts and dedication to the RCIA and formation programs in our parish, providing  that needed support to others to come to and to grow in the Catholic faith.

As well as to  Michelle Grzywa, doing so much behind-the-scenes, so many details, to help provide such a  beautiful worship space, that helps us to focus on the Lord and in all hopes to fruitful prayer and deeper relationship with our Lord.

It is so encouraging to see so many come to our Easter Sunday Masses, even  necessitating the use of the Social Hall for the 7:30 a.m., 9:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Masses. A special thanks to Bill Heese and the maintenance crew for all their work in  getting the Church ready and setting up the 650 chairs in the Social Hall.

Linda Gries also deserves Easter kudos for the awesome work she did to organize the simulcasting that enabled up to 650 people at most of our Masses to participate from our Social Hall.

Certainly many that came on Easter Sunday were visiting family, but many we imagine live close by although may not be regular Mass goers, so our hope and prayer is that the  flame of faith may increase in their hearts and through our welcoming community and  prayers, they may return to our parish each weekend. Please keep them and those from our  RCIA and formation programs in your prayers.

Easter Season blessings to you and your loved ones.

Frs. Dave and Pat

Reeson’s Ramblings :: April 23, 2017

Let’s Cool It!

Fr. Dave Reeson

Fr. Dave Reeson

Our parish plan is to pay off phase two of “Pave the Way” and have one-half the money on hand before we proceed with phase three which will include a new more efficient Air Conditioning System for the Church and Social Hall. In order to keep the old Church/Social Hall AC units running, we have had the AC units repaired and serviced seven times since I have been here in the past two years which is rather costly for our parish. We have slowly but surely been paying down phase two of “Pave the Way” but we still owe $147,700.

I would like to get the three quotes for the new AC units, as is the policy of our Finance Council, and secure ASAP the funds to pay off “phase two” and raise one-half the funds for “phase three” so we can move more quickly to replace the units. I encourage you to join me in making a sacrificial gift that will help make St. Columbkille’s not only the best parish but also the “coolest” Church in the Archdiocese of Omaha. When it is 95 degrees with 90% humidity outside we will all be happy that we pressed hard to secure the new energy efficient units! If anyone is interested in what I am willing to contribute to the cause, I am even willing to “release my tax returns!”

I am so delighted with Deacon Eldon Lauber, Michelle Grzwya and Doug McWilliams who prepared our Easter Candle, which is the largest in the Archdiocese. If you missed it on our Parish Blog, see the story below.

Preparing the Easter Candle

Easter "Paschal" candle

For the past 34 years, Deacon Eldon Lauber carefully prepares the Easter “Paschal” candle for St. Columbkille.

In 1983, Brother William, Director of Office for Divine Worship in the Archdiocese of Omaha, taught one of our very own deacons, Eldon Lauber, how to prepare the Easter candle for the vigil service held on Holy Saturday. For the past 34 years, Deacon Eldon Lauber has followed Brother William’s instructions and carefully prepared the Easter “Paschal” candle at St. Columbkille.

The Paschal candle represents Christ, the Light of the World. The pure beeswax of which the candle is made represents the sinless Christ who was formed in the womb of His Mother. The wick signifies His humanity, the flame, His Divine Nature, both soul and body.

Largest Easter Candle in the Omaha Archdiocese

Michelle Grzwya, Deacon Eldon Lauber, and Doug McWilliams with the largest Easter Candle in the Archdiocese.

Five grains of incense inserted into the candle in the form of a cross recall the aromatic spices with which His Sacred Body was prepared for the tomb, and of the five wounds in His hands, feet, and side. The wooden spikes are inserted into the candle and melted beeswax secure them in place.

The Easter Vigil begins with the blessing and lighting of a new fire, symbolizing our eternal life in Christ, and is used to  light the new Easter candle. The candle, representing Christ himself, is blessed by the priest who then cuts a cross into the candle, the first letters and last of the Greek alphabet, (Alpha and Omega `the beginning and the end’) and the current year, as he prays:

Christ yesterday and today; the Beginning and the End; the Alpha; and the Omega. All time
belongs to him; and all the pages. To him be glory and power; through every age and forever. Amen.

The priest then lights the candle from the new fire, saying: “May the light of Christ rising in glory dispel the darkness of our hearts and minds.”

The Easter candle is used throughout the Easter season until Ascension Thursday. It is also used at every funeral Mass and Baptism throughout the year.

We are grateful to Deacon Lauber for taking the time and special care to prepare our Easter candle each year. Thanks also to Doug McWilliams, our candle preparation “apprentice” and Michelle Grzywa for her efforts to prepare our worship space for the Easter celebration.

More photos on our Parish Blog

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