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When it was built in 1982, the church interior was designed using the guidelines set forth at the time by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Liturgy.   Since then, there have been a few updates to the aesthetics of St. Columbkille which are visual representations of higher elements, weaving symbolism into the frame of our church. 

The stained glass windows at the top of the east wall of the sanctuary represent the life of Jesus, the life of St. Columbkille, and the life of a Disciple. A strong horizontal matrix of a green Celtic knot-work unites the windows visually and expresses the idea of the interwoven nature of the many aspects of Catholic spirituality which are expressed by unique center elements in each of the windows. The windows become symbolically a type of rosary; the mysteries of the spiritual life linked together and leading to deeper realities.

Life of Jesus

  • Birth of Christ

    Birth of Christ

    A manger within a humble nativity stable. Above, the star that led the Magi from the East shines brightly.

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Life of Saint Columbkille

  • Lamb of God

    Lamb of God

    The lamb is poised on a book with the seven seals, imagery from the Book of Revelation — “Worthy is the lamb who was slain.”

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Life of a Disciple

  • Feeding the Hungry

    Feeding the Hungry

    This imagery recalls a soup kitchen and references Matthew 25:31-46 in which Jesus directs us to feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, shelter the stranger, clothe the naked, look after the sick, and visit prisoners.

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The tabernacle door facing the chapel presents a unique image of Jesus, taken from the Book of Kells.

The Book of Kells is Ireland’s greatest national art treasure. It is an illuminated manuscript that presents a Latin translation of the Four Gospels, accompanied by a dazzling array of decorative ornamentation, iconography and illustration. The book is named after the Abbey of Kells in County Meath, Ireland, where it is believed monks from order of St. Columbkille created its pages. There is historical speculation that St. Columbkille himself did some of the manuscript and its illustrations.

The image on the tabernacle door is a representation of Christ enthroned in majesty in heaven. Christ is presented at the center of the image, seated on a throne and surrounded by four angels, holding the Book of Life on which are inscribed the names of the saints.

As is often the case in early religious art, Jesus is pictured as a man from the place and time the local artists would have known. For this reason, the image of Jesus in the Book of Kells has light colored hair.

This image of Christ contains peacocks which are a symbol of eternal life because of the ancient belief that dead peacocks did not rot. Also, the dazzling display of color in a peacock’s feathers serve as a metaphor of majesty. The two peacocks are set against a second image, that of a chalice from which vines are sprouting. The chalice is a symbol of the Eucharist; the vines are symbols of Christ’s lineage as the Son of Man going back to Adam and the “true Israel.”

Common to Celtic art are the three leveled spirals surrounding the entire image. They represent the Trinity and the three components of the saving mystery of Jesus: life, death, and resurrection.  Celtic knots found in this image and in the stained glass windows in the clerestory in the church are representative of eternal life – having no beginning and no end.

The belltower rings before all Masses, calling all to prayer and worship.  It houses the same bell from the very first church, donated in honor of Catherina Schram.  You can also hear the pealing on the bell at weddings and tolling at funerals.